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Enakamigag Anishnabewakin

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Volume 2 - No. 1 - March - April 2005

In This Issue...

 

 

Political Commitment of Mr. Lucien Wabanonik

In order to become emancipated and develop ourselves as a people, we need to organise our co-existence and have a treaty with our neighbours, we need to take our rightful political place among the peoples of this world, which will allow us to have our autonomy and freely pursue our development.

To this end, I commit to review the way our Tribal Council organisation is operating. We need to create a political party that will represent the whole Algonquin Nation while respecting our values, spirituality and way of life, which will further unite our political leaders under a common objective, i.e. the reconciliation of our people with themselves. We will need to work on a new national constitution for our Nation that will be more equitable and fair to each and everyone.

As for the administrative services, the member communities would receive the same services from competent professionals.
I commit to address the land, natural resources, and community jurisdiction and membership issues. These issues need to be on our people and local political leaders’ agenda. Thus, it is clear that we need to protect our natural resources from over-exploitation and misuse for our future generations but also for those who still depend on them today.

We all know that our communities are in dire need and that we are under-funded, and for a majority of us, under-developed. Our youth are using their cultural identity and are in despair, as they see no future in their community. Our elders lose hope, as they do not communicate any more with their own grandchildren who can hardly speak their mother tongue. Therefore, I also commit to maintain and promote our cultural distinctiveness and the revival of our Anishnabe language in our communities.

I commit to work with the Chiefs in a spirit of cooperation and mutual respect, to work on our Nation’s unity, and to keep our communities informed on the outcome of these efforts.

Finally, I will challenge both governments to negotiate a fair and equitable treaty, not under their land claims policy but rather based on the principle of self-determination as defined by the United Nations.

In closing, I believe in our members’ capacity, in their intelligence, and I believe in our people and in its future. It is now our common responsibility as political leaders, youth, elders and women, irrespective of which tribal organization we belong to, on- or off-reserve, to stand up together to improve our condition, as only a collective effort will allow us to change the obstacles into hope and opportunities for the future.

Solemnly committed by Lucien Wabanonik Member of the Anishnabe People

 

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New Economic Development Advisor at the Tribal Council

The Algonquin Anishinabeg Nation Tribal Council is happy to welcome Mrs. Carole Whiteduck in the position of Economic Development Advisor. Native of Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg Carole obtained a degree in addiction counselling in 1993 from the Native Training Institute of Quebec. She then worked as an Addiction Counsellor at the Wanaki Centre. In 1998 her and two of her sisters started a business specialized in office supplies and the sale of a variety of English books. More recently, she was the Receptionist at the Kitigan Zibi Health Centre.

She is happy to start as the Economic Development Advisor at the Tribal Council and she is anxious to visit our communities and meet people. Carole’s services will include assisting and advising the member communities in areas related to economic development. Notably, she will help identify development opportunities and will recommend strategies and potential partnerships.

Carole can be reached at the AANTC office at (819) 449-1225 or by email at carolew@anishinabenation.ca.

 

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A Word from Micheline Anichinapéo

Kwe Anishinabekwek,

My name is Micheline Anichinapeo of Lac Simon, mother and Kokom at the same time. I am really proud to be your Representative as an Algonquin woman. I am anxious to meet you in your respective communities.

 

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Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

Ten out of 1000 kids in industrialized countries are victims, at various levels, of fetal alcohol syndrome. Fetal alcohol syndrome is the main chemical cause of intellectual deficiency. The risks associated to alcohol consumption during pregnancy were suspected for many years but the French pediatrician Paul Lemoine only identified the consequences of fetal alcoholism as a clinical entity for the first time in 1968. Since then, research has been conducted in America and Europe and clinical interventions have been adapted to the different concerned clientele. Fetal alcoholism and its impacts constitute one of the major health problems almost everywhere in the international community. This is a disease that we can nevertheless, prevent. (Source: FASD International Francophone Conference’s Website)

Support groups for people touched by fetal alcohol syndrome exist in different communities. Notably, at the Children Hospital of Eastern Ontario a group including parents and professionals get together monthly to exchange on the subject (for information contact 613.737.1122).

Furthermore, in Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg a group, also made up of parents and interveners have created a support group. They are evaluating the eventual possibility of offering resources dedicated to that type of clientele.

 

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Update about Lac Simon/Long Point

The relationship between the coalition formed by Long Point and Lac Simon and the Quebec government is still not improving. By mid-January the communities’ two Chiefs signed the agreement proposed by Quebec, but asked for certain modifications that they judged minor. They were greatly disappointed to see that the government instead of going along with the document asked for a complete rewriting that, according to the Coalition, entirely modifies the agreement in principle previously accepted.

Therefore, Lac Simon and Long Point believe less and less in a fast resolution to the conflict. They believe that the government does not take into account their needs and interests. After a meeting between the two negotiators on February 14th, they are still hopeful, but nothing has changed so far. The Coalition plans on taking actions to signify their discontent.

Source: Jean Cotten / 819.722.2441

 

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First Nations of Quebec and Labrador’s Economic Development Commission

The First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Economic Development Commission (FNQLEDC) is a consultation body for the officers and representatives of the native and Inuit community economic development organizations.
In December 1999, First Nations of Quebec and Labrador delegates, representatives of government departments and economic development organizations, and numerous observers founded an association bringing together the Community Economic Development Organizations (CEDOs) and economic development representatives. The association was named the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Economic Development Commission (FNQLEDC).
The FNQLEDC received recognition from the Chiefs’ Assembly in May 2000. In November 2000, the Chiefs’ Assembly instructed the FNQLEDC to create a development plan and to seek the funding required for its operations.
Like other organizations under the authority of the Assembly of First Nations of Quebec and Labrador (AFNQL), the FNQLEDC is an agency based on the principle of ensuring optimal First Nations control and accountability for its human, financial and natural resources. Furthermore, the FNQLEDC will ensure that all member communities will receive the utmost benefits with the understanding that local authority of each community and CEDO’s will be maintained.
Vision
The FNQLEDC works with all community economic development organizations and representatives without overstepping the bounds of local autonomy and political allegiance.
The FNQLEDC is an organization devoted to the sharing of knowledge as a means of supporting and promoting the economic development of its members. It recognizes that access to quality information is an essential condition for making sions in the best interest of all members.
New Economic Development Advisor
(Continued from page 1)
First Nations of Quebec and Labrador’s Economic Development Commission
A meeting for the Health Directors from the member communities was organized by the Tribal Council. The meeting gave the six participants the opportunity to share information regarding their particular health issues. The meeting was held in Val d’Or at Motel l’Escale on January 26-27, 2005.
communities and Inuit villages of Quebec and Labrador, that is over 45,000 members of the First Peoples.
The board of directors
The economic development officers gathered in a general assembly, appoint a board of directors formed of one representative per Nation: Abenaki, Innu, Algonquin, Huron-Wendat, Cree, Attikamek, Inuit, Malecite, Mi’kmak, Mohawk and Naskapi.
The board of directors indicates the priorities to the FNQLEDC Executive office, who is responsible for its implementation. The board endowed itself with an Executive committee who is responsible to follow up the mandates. The board must make sure that the five mandates are fulfilled: Provide training to the economic development officer, support the members, represent their interests, pursue researching work and ensure their development.
Source: First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Economic Development Commission’s Website
First Nations of Quebec and Labrador’s Economic Development Commission
(Continued from page 3)
The Algonquin Anishinabeg Nation Tribal Council is happy to welcome Mrs. Carole
Whiteduck in the position of Economic
Development Advisor. (More details on page 3)
decisions in the best interest of all members.
Mission
The FNQLEDC’s mission is to provide liaison, communication and information structures that will support, promote and defend the main players in economic development in its member communities and organizations.
Administrative Structure
The communities and organizations involved in community economic development of the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador can be members of the FNQLEDC and obtain a seat at the general assembly. Since its creation, the FNQLEDC has been representing the economic interests of the Native communities and Inuit villages of Quebec and Labrador, that is over 45,000 members of the First Peoples.

The board of directors

The economic development officers gathered in a general assembly, appoint a board of directors formed of one representative per Nation: Abenaki, Innu, Algonquin, Huron-Wendat, Cree, Attikamekw, Inuit, Malecite, Mi'kmak, Mohawk and Naskapi.

The board of directors indicates the priorities to the FNQLEDC Executive Office, who is responsible for its implementation. The board endowed itself with an Executive committee who is responsible to follow up the mandates. The board must make sure that the five mandates are fulfilled: Provide training to the economic development officer, support the members, represent their interests, pursue researching work and ensure their development.

Source: First Nation of Quebec and Labrador Economic Development Commission's Website

 

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Health Directors Meeting

A meeting for the Health Directors from the members communities was organized by the Tribal Council. The meeting gave the six participants the oppoirtunity to share information regarding their particular health issues. The meeting was held in Val d'Or at Motel l'Escale on January 26-27, 2005.

 

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Swearing In Ceremony

For the first time in the history of the Algonquin Anishinabeg Nation Tribal Council a swearing in ceremony took place in Lac Simon on January 22nd, 2005.

The ceremony was an occasion to pay tribute and to welcome the AANTC’s newly elected representatives. During the past four years, from 2000 to 2004, the representatives were:
Jimmy Hunter, Grand Chief, Frank Meness, Vice Grand Chief, Albert Tenasco Jr., Elders Representative, Diane Polson, Women Representative, Winona Polson-Lahache, Youth Representative.

For the next four years the elected representatives that will sit on the AANTC’s Board of Directors are:
Lucien Wabanonik, Grand Chief, Marlène Jérôme, Vice Grand Chief, Albert Tenasco Jr., Elders Representative, Micheline Anichinapéo, Women Representative, Gloria Anichinapéo, Youth Representative.

The ceremony started at 5:40 pm with a welcoming word by the Planner/Coordinator and Animator of the event, Noe Mitchell. He introduced each of the representatives and invited them to make a speech. People were then invited to celebrate and the evening ended with dancing.

 

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Human Resources Section
by Angela Benedict, Human Resources Advisor

First Nations Management Training
The Algonquin Anishinabeg Nation Tribal Council, in partnership with the consultant firm Cose, delivered to the member communities’ managers and directors, the fourth unit of the management training for First Nations. Titled “Performance Appraisals”, the training was offered in Val d’Or on January 25-26, 2005. This fourth unit, given over a day and a half period is the fourth of a series of twelve. In all, twenty-three managers, directors, supervisors, etc., from the six member communities continued their journey to improve and/or update their existing knowledge to increase their professional skills and qualifications.

Management Training Session
It is with great enthusiasm that the Algonquin Anishinabeg Nation Tribal Council is planning to offer the fifth training session “Management of Objectives and Performance Indicators” on June 7-8th at the Val-d’Or Native Friendship Center. Again we are hoping that a large number of our communities’ managers will take part in the activity.

Labour Standards Workshop
In collaboration with Human Resources and Skills Development Canada we are proud to present a workshop on Labour Standards. This session will be offered to managers, directors and supervisors from our member communities. The workshop will be held following the First Nation Management Training Module 5. You will soon receive more detailed information. However, if you already wish to let us know of your interest in attending feel free to contact me at (819) 449-1225 or by email at angelab@anishinabenation.ca.

Review session in Kitcisakik
A review session for the 2nd module of the management training for First Nations - Communication & Feedback was held in Kitcisakik on January 24, 2005 for 6 participants from that community. The session was hosted by an
instructor from Cose.

 

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Recycling Section

Hi my name is Patricia and it has now been a few weeks since I starting working as a Recycling Research Coordinator and in those few weeks I did a lot of catching up on reading and researching environmental problems. It’s been very interesting and challenging because recycling and waste management have always been a huge issue. In the up-coming weeks I will be looking into providing tips, information on ways to help reduce our household waste, and will be presenting this information to the community members, schools and perhaps distribute it to homes. Also as part of my duties it is to help coordinate and develop a recycling program, and possibly assist in the start-up.

The following pages is a brief description and interesting facts on landfills, waste and recycling. The information provided will give you an idea on what to expect in the future weeks.

REDUCE, REUSE AND RECYCLE!
Call it solid waste, garbage, refuse, trash but did you know it is estimated that each of us generates 5 lbs. of it per day and approximately 50% of that can be recycled into a new product or reused again. When we toss out our garbage, it may leave our homes but not the earth! Where does it go? And what happens to last nights soft drinks, plastics, glass, bottles, or batteries we no longer use? Most of it is taken away to landfills and there it stays for years. Following is a list of non-biodegradable products and the time it takes for it to breakdown:
Trash / Item - Years it takes to breakdown
Aluminum cans - 80 to 100 years
Cigarette butt - 1 to 5 years
Plastic bags - Between 20 and 1 000 years
Plastic bags (bread, milk) - 20 to 30 years
Nylon Fabric - 30 to 40 years
Leather - Up to 50 years
Tin cans - 50 years
Wool socks - 1 to 5 years
Glass bottles - 1 million years
Plastic bottles - Indefinitely
Batteries - 100 years
Fishing nets - 30 to 40 years

Even if a waste site is properly maintained, it can cause a range of serious environmental problems and can continue long after the site is closed down. Other various environmental problems include the toxic fluids that leak from landfills causing contamination into the surrounding water table and soil, the ghastly garbage odours, the disease transmission by pests (birds, and insects), the release of greenhouse gases (nitrous oxide, methane, and carbon dioxide) when the site is decomposing, and the loss of resources when materials which can be recycled into something new or reused again are buried in a landfill. A well known fact: Anishinabe people long ago used to produce little waste especially when it came to hunting. We would use every part of the animal whether it was for food, clothing, tools and other uses until it disintegrated. Now today the society has changed and we have everything at our fingertips and even things we don’t need or probably used once, we throw out for it to take up space in a landfill.

For this we need to change our habits and attitudes towards solid waste. We need a better understanding of how to manage our trash in a responsible way that protects our environment (Mother Earth) for future generations.

Following are tips we can take part in helping to protect our environment by REDUCING, REUSING and RECYCLING.

When in the kitchen and elsewhere in the home:

- Avoid using Styrofoam plates. Which only creates more trash and can not be recycled. Instead use only reusable plates and utensils.
- Use re-usable containers to store food instead of plastic wrap and aluminum foil.
- Start composting by placing food scraps, used paper towels, dead plants and leaves into bins and later the organic materials can be used as a nutrient to improve plant growth.
- Reduce household products that are hazardous and harmful to you and the environment. (e.g. cleaning fluids, solvents, paints and automotive supplies.) They are flammable, toxic, corrosive and explosive and it should not be disposed of in normal garbage bins, drains or sewers.
- Buy rechargeable batteries instead of disposable batteries which can contain hazardous substances such as heavy metals and other metals. These elements threaten the environment and should be recycled. Call these stores to see if they recycle batteries and what types do they accept.(Radio Shack, Home depot, or Wal-Mart)

When shopping:
- Bring your own canvas bag to avoid plastic or paper bags. Avoid under packaging. Or if you already participate in a recycling program, use paper bags from the store to collect various papers in, whether it be yesterdays newspaper, old magazines, telephone books etc. And makes it a lot easier to recycle by throwing the whole bag into bins.
- If buying a small quantity of items tell the cashier you don’t need a bag.
- Instead of buying new items, reuse items as much as possible or when purchasing an item look for the “close the loop” sign which indicates you are buying recycle, and saving energy.

Facts on recycling aluminum cans, various papers, and plastics:

Aluminum cans:

- 70% of aluminum cans are recycled
- To make a new can made from recycled aluminum can takes 95% less energy
- It takes as little as 60 days to place a newly recycled aluminum can back on a grocery shelf
- One recycled aluminum can saves enough energy to light a 100 watt light bulb for approximately for 4 hours or run a television for 3 hours.

Corrugated cardboard, newspapers, and paper :
- Corrugated cardboard boxes have a wavy inside layer sandwiched between layers of liner board and is also light weight, strong and comes in custom sizes. It is known best for its use of packaging, storing and transporting products. But did you know that when recycled it can contain up to 80% of old corrugated boxes and made into new container boards and paperboard boxes. Other recycled corrugated boxes can be used to make flower pots, gift wrap, gypsum wall board liner, and gardening supplies to name a few. Note: if a contaminated cardboard covered with grease, oil, or paint it should not be recycled be thrown out with the other garbage.
- What about newspapers? What is it recycled into? Most newspapers are recycled into newsprint for newspapers, inserts, and flyers. It is recycled into cereal boxes, shoe boxes, and laundry soap boxes to name a few. Note: Some recycling programs do not accept newspaper unless it is free of staples, paper clips, elastics, and plastic bags. Check with your local recycling program.

Various paper:
Did you know that fine paper is made from woodchips and sawmill residue. These materials are pulped and pressed into sheets. We use it everyday for writing, copying, and printing in the office, schools, or at home. When recycled, fine paper is used to make tissue paper, printing and writing paper, and paperboard packaging. And did you know that for every tonne of paper used for recycling it saves: 17 trees, 7000 gallons of water, 4100 kilowatt hours of electricity, 463 gallons of oil, and reduces carbon dioxide emissions by 850 pounds per year. (Source: Department of Environment Conservation.)
Most importantly it saves landfill space.
A few facts: (Source: Green team)
- It takes up to one year for paper to decompose
- it can be recycled approximately five times before the fibers begins to weaken
Glass:
- Glass is 100 % recyclable and can be used many times without changing its quality. Different types are recycled when either returned for a deposit refund, and through recycling programs.
- 82% of glass containers consumed in Canada every year are reused or recycled
- It takes 8 to 12 weeks for a glass container to be recycled into a new product and returned to store shelves (Source: Just the facts: Glass)

Plastics:
Many things we use today are made of different types of plastic (soft drinks bottles, margarine containers, in cars, toys etc.) It is light weight, easily shaped and durable. but did you know that plastics have a coded system from one to seven. (SPI Coding System) Its for the recycling manufacturers to better understand and identify the different types of plastics.
A few facts:
For every tonne of plastic recycled we save 76 million btu’s of energy.
- It takes 1050 milk jugs to make one 6 foot plastic lumber
- It takes five to 10 soft drink bottles to make the fiberfill for one ski jacket, or 40 to 50 soft drink bottles to make enough fiberfill to make one sleeping bag.
If a recycling program already exist in your area, remember to check what SPI codes are accepted, and remember to rinse and flatten out the bottles and containers to conserve bin space.
So how much do you know about recycling?
1. Everyday we produce____ pounds of waste per day.
a) 2 lbs b) 3 lbs c) 4 lbs d) 5 lbs

2. _____ percent of our trash is recyclable.
a) 15% b) 20% c) 40% d) 50% e) 75%

3. What are the 3 R’s?

4. When a tonne of paper is recycled ______ trees are saved: ( 17, 20, 40, 60)
a) 17 b) 20 c) 40 d) 60

5. How many soft drink bottles does it take to make one fiberfill ski jacket?
a) 1 b) 6 c) 10 d) 25

Help celebrate Earth on April 22, 2005 by REDUCING, REUSING and RECYCLING!
For more information: www.earthday.net

Correct answers:
1. d) 5
2. d) 50%
3. Reduce, reuse, recycle
4. a) 17
5. c) 10

 

 

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